Nazarene Then And Now

The word ‘Nazarene’ is one of the 2 Mshikaye communities (Indo: anointed followers) of the Jews in the 1st century. In addition to the Nazarene, there is an Ebionite community who are equally convinced that Yeshua is the long-awaited Jewish Messiah. Both communities are believed to be fragments of the Qumran Essents who are the descendants of the original Imam Zadokit.

The Essenes chose to move to Qumran because their role as a priest in the Jerusalem Temple was taken over by Zadokite priests (Sadducees) under the control of Hasmonean. In the refuge, they were active in writing the books and substituting animal sacrifices for slaughter by eating bread and wine. They create a community that awaits the Reincarnation of the Melchizedek Priest.

Around the year 26 AD, the Prophet Yuchnan (John) the Baptist who grew up among the Esseni Qumran. Mar Yuchnan claimed that he had come to prepare for the coming of the Messiah, for which all the Elders and Jews, in general, we’re looking forward to who would come. Rabbi Eashoa (Heb: Yeshua) came, He was Maruch Yuchnan’s own cousin, his mother’s relative and the descendant of King David, the holder of the kings of Judah. He was Yeshua who was baptized by Yuchnan. It was from the Baptism following the Essene tradition that the Essence’s flocked to Yeshua. Eventually, they believed that He was the Melchizedek Priest they were waiting to restore the Temple.

When Maran Yeshua taught, He said that He came also to do HaTorah (Torah Sinai / Law), this is recorded in Matt. 5: 18-20. But the problem is that despite the name of the Law, the teaching content between Moses and Yeshua is very different. The highlight of the difference is of course at the sacrifice of the Yeshua man on the cross. In the teachings of Moses, this is strictly forbidden! This is opposed !!! Because of these many differences, the Yeshua followers of this Jew were divided. When many Gentiles began to believe in Yeshua, they (Ebionites) who followed the teachings of Moses (Law) impose circumcision and all other rules. While the Apostles and also Mar Paul did not teach that. Because of this absolute difference came the Council of Jerusalem in the year 50 AD. All the apostles, prophets, Mshikaye leaders gathered in Jerusalem. Jerusalem was then led by Bishop Mar Jacob HaTzadiq, Maran Eashoa’s half-brother. The congregation was also led by Apostle Peter (Peter), this is recorded in Acts chapter 15. In short, the council decided that the Gentiles (goyim), not to be circumcised, did not need to follow the Law. The Ebionites then separated themselves from other believers and became extinct in the second century, having no other followers. While the Jewish Nazarene, they merged with the Messianic Churches founded by the Apostles. They inherit all traditions newly instituted or standardized in the 1st century. this is recorded in Acts chapter 15. In short the council decides that the Gentiles (goyim), need not be circumcised, do not need to follow the Law. The Ebionites then separated themselves from other believers and became extinct in the second century, having no other followers. While the Jewish Nazarene, they merged with the Messianic Churches founded by the Apostles. They inherit all traditions newly instituted or standardized in the 1st century. this is recorded in Acts chapter 15. In short, the council decides that the Gentiles (goyim), need not be circumcised, do not need to follow the Law. The Ebionites then separated themselves from other believers and became extinct in the second century, having no other followers. While the Jewish Nazarene, they merged with the Messianic Churches founded by the Apostles. They inherit all traditions newly instituted or standardized in the 1st century.

The other absolute difference between Nazarene and Ebionite is that the Ebionites do not believe that Maran Yeshua is a divine being. They only judged that Yeshua was the Messiah, the son of Mar Yosip the carpenter of Judah. The many Nazarenes entering the Eastern Church Church of The East and the other Apostolic Churches, share in Yeshua’s divinity. In many traditions, the deity of Yeshua is taught primarily on the first Christian Liturgy (Hebrew: siddur) named after the Bishop of Jerusalem, Mar Jacob. Siddur Jacob or St. James Divine Liturgy is peeling Yeshua figure is a divine figure and a whole human being. This is hard to decipher, but this is what the apostles taught. From the many traditions then came from there the holy books.

The Indonesian Christian Church in the 21st century continues to preserve the ancient Nazarene beliefs by judging that Maran Yeshua is the Lord and Messiah of the Savior. We preserve all the early traditions and also use the Siddur Mar Jacob HaTzadiq. The leaders of Nazarene Indonesia have the ordination of leadership from Antioch and Mesopotamia Church of The East.

Please be on the lookout, even though the Ebionites are completely extinct in the 2nd century AD, but their teachings are still being raised by some circles. There is one Church of the Apostle who rejects the divinity of Yeshua and also a Christian denomination (Jehovah’s Witness) who believes so.

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NAZIRITE

THE NAZIRITE

The Hebrew word NAZIR is today used for a monk, but the Torah has no place for such celibacy, and only the prophet Moses and certain true Tzaddikim were permitted to separate themselves from “the way of the world”. The Torah NAZIR was not one who separated himself from the world as a recluse from normal life. (On the contrary, the laws of NAZIR are bound up with family life: a man may make his son a NAZIR, he may invite his wife to take the vow of NAZIR, nullify her vow, etc.) The Nazirite vow is one that would in Temple times be taken on by a regular, normal person who did not want to separate himself from the entire world but did want to set extra limits on his own behavior over and above what the Torah requires of everyone.

Following on from the above-quoted Midrash — “Everybody who sees the damage done by and to the Sotah will want to abstain from wine, which is what brings to fornication” — the NAZIR living in the real world full of immorality wants to set for himself or herself extra personal boundaries against anything that may even lead to such immorality — wine and anything connected with wine, and even fancy hairstyles! The Nazirite may not defile himself with the dead, for while death exposes the folly of worship of the body, fears of aging and death often drive people to seek out the pleasures of the body compulsively.

The section dealing with the NAZIR sets forth the detailed laws of the Nazirite vow, yet implies that taking on specific vows is not encouraged by the Torah. Among his sacrifices the Nazirite has to bring a sin-offering for abstaining from permitted pleasures, as if what the Torah itself prohibits is not enough. When we take on vows, sometimes the tests become overwhelming, and may cause us to break them unwittingly (like the Nazirite who becomes unwittingly defiled by contact with the dead.).

What the Torah wants from us is the true labor of the heart: commitment. A vow is an explicit verbal commitment that we make, creating a Torah of our own, something that goes beyond the letter of the law. It may be in the form of a personal boundary. It may be in the form of a specific commitment. Jacob, the founding father of Israel, builder of the home, was the first one to make a vow. At Mount Moriah, the Temple Mount where Jacob dreamed of the ladder (SULAM = SINAI = Giving of the Torah), he woke up and set up the Temple foundation and vowed to give a tithe of all he received to G-d. The Torah that came forth from the Sanctuary (Leviticus 1:1) begins with a vow — that of a person who wants to offer a sacrifice in the Temple: “When a person would offer an offering” (Leviticus 1:2).

The Nazirite vow is much more demanding than a one-time sacrifice: it is a commitment to a very strict discipline — complete abstinence from grapes and wine, no haircutting to emphasize the opposite of body-oriented immorality, etc. In the present day world in which we lead our lives, the actual Nazirite vow is not a practical possibility, but we certainly all know ways in which it is desirable to hedge ourselves in with personal boundaries that help separate ourselves from that which is negative and evil in this world of Good and Evil.

What is asked of us is to make our personal boundaries and adhere to them without expressing them in the form of specific vows. The danger of the vow is that during the initial enthusiasm in which in which it is made, we may not see prospective difficulties that could make it impossible to adhere to it. What is asked of us is not to tie ourselves up in verbal commitments that we cannot keep, but rather, to make an inner commitment — the commitment of the heart — to what we know to be good, and then do everything in our power to adhere to our commitment.